Showing posts from tagged with: Borders

Measuring Brexit Costs

As of 2016, the value of traded goods and services each week between Ireland and the UK is €1.2 billion. Meanwhile over a year since the UK referendum we still don’t have any real clarity on what the final agreement between the EU and the UK might look like. Given such uncertainty, what can businesses do to identify some of the trade-related implications as a result of Brexit under different scenarios?

Many of these scenarios point to the probability of the UK leaving the customs union, and businesses involved in Ireland-UK trade are now assessing the detail of what the financial impact could be. Unless there is a tariff-free EU/UK trade agreement, Irish goods will be subject to tariffs and the EU’s external border will run through Ireland, with a customs regime between the two jurisdictions. For Irish exporters with imported inputs in their products there are significant implications.

Businesses should consider identifying their impacted supply chains now and quantify the financial consequences of potential additional customs duties, VAT and trade compliance costs. Software such as that developed by KPMG can help businesses deconstruct their supply chains and identify where the costs, bottlenecks and opportunities may lie.

Interrogating your data from different angles is critical. Using VAT and Customs filing data, the software can produce a bespoke report quantifying the key customs duty and VAT impacts arising from Brexit. The tool maps the flows of goods into and out of the UK, giving visibility over the elements of the supply chain that are most exposed to additional cost or supply chain risk as a result of Brexit.

Businesses can then work to identify specific solutions to the issues raised, which could involve alternative supplier sourcing, revision of trade terms or changes to the logistics process. Regardless of possible eventual Brexit outcomes for Ireland, businesses who understand their supply chains now and use innovative technology to quantify product, customer or supply chain exposures will be amongst those best placed for the post-Brexit world – whatever that brings.

Marie Armstrong is a Tax Partner with KPMG in Dublin.

For more details on planning for Brexit and KPMG's indirect tax impact assessment tool, download the pdf by clicking here.
KPMG Ireland is a Platinum sponsor of the Export Industry Awards.

Guest Blog Post | | 0 comments

Brexit and Borders

As we move into the negotiation and “divorce” phase of Brexit the main questions being asked by Irish Exporters are

Will there be additional tariffs to consider

Will there be border controls on trade with the UK

While nothing is known with certainty, particularly in relation to tariffs, there are at this point some extremely likely outcomes which businesses need to start preparing for.

Tariff and Duty Costs

The question on the introduction or not of tariffs is probably the most “known unknown”. The answer will depend on whether, or not, there is some form of (Free) Trade Agreement concluded between the EU and the UK. This it-self will only be known after the conclusion of, or at least positive developments in the “Divorce Negotiations”.

At a high level there are two possible outcomes:

A Free Trade Agreement is concluded which allows for a 0% duty rate on trade between the EU and UK.
If this is concluded Exporters still need to be aware of two potential complications
i) Most FTAs require companies to prove their goods are “originating” in order to benefit from the preferential duty rate. This in itself can be a complex process.
ii) Most FTAs do not cover agricultural products or restrict the benefits for agricultural products. While this may be unlikely for an EU-UK Trade agreement it still needs to be considered.

No FTA type agreement is reached and Tariffs are imposed.
In this case the tariff on import into Ireland/ the EU will be the duty rate currently applied by the EU. The tariff on import into the UK will be set independently by the UK Government. This could range from 0% to EU tariff rates to WTO bound rates.

A prudent approach therefore is to assess the impact of EU/WTO rates in looking at the potential additional duty cost that might arise on imports into the UK; and assess the impact of the current EU rates on imports into Ireland from the UK.

 

Borders

The key question at present, possibly more than tariffs, is whether there will be border controls introduced. This tends to break down into two aspects

Will there be border controls, and the requirement for Export and Import Declarations, at the Sea Ports and Airports?

Will there be border controls, and the requirement for Export and Import Declarations, at the North-South Border?

The unfortunate answer is that it is extremely difficult to see a situation where, under current EU legislation, there are no border controls.

We do have to look however at what this means.

Firstly will there be a requirement to lodge Export and Import declarations (SADs in Ireland/C88 in the UK)? It is almost impossible to see a situation where this will not be a requirement once the UK is a non-EU Country.

What does this mean?

Customs Declarations require 54 boxes of information to be supplied to Revenue, from details of the consignor/consignee to customs value to tariff classification to weights. Probably the most complex part of this is the requirement to provide the tariff classification.

These Export and Import Declarations need to be lodged with Customs, electronically, prior to export/import. Most goods will obtain instant clearance (95%) but some goods will require further checks before being allowed to clear. In all cases however these Declarations can be subject to post-clearance audit any time within the next three years.

It is important to remember that the lodging of Export and Import Declarations is no different to lodging any Tax Declaration and therefore the information supplied to Customs needs to be 100% accurate and correct or you may be subject to additional duty costs, fines and penalties (As with any Tax Audit).

The next concern is the type of border controls which might be introduced by Customs. At this point this is not 100% clear but ideally, will involve the use of electronic systems to minimise delays. As we know from many of the recent news reports this is a critical aspect for Revenue at present.

What next?

At this point most companies impacted by trading in the UK are looking at reviewing their supply chains and assessing the impact of additional tariff and non-tariff barriers on their businesses.

This modelling can be done using many resources. Enterprise Ireland, for example recently launched the ‘Brexit SME Scorecard’, a new interactive online platform which can be used by all Irish companies to self-assess their exposure to Brexit under six business pillars. Based on answers supplied by the user, the Scorecard generates an immediate report which contains suggested actions and resources, and information on events for companies to attend, to prepare for Brexit. The platform can be accessed at www.prepareforbrexit.ie

We would therefore recommend that companies pro-actively engage in completing this type of analysis and increase their knowledge of Customs.  This is particularly important for those companies who sell only within Europe, and have a significant portion of sales in the UK,  as this may be their first interaction with the Customs Authorities.

 

For more information about our partnership with BDO Ireland click here.

BDO Ireland | | 0 comments

Brexit: FAQs

  1. When will the UK finally leave the EU?

At present it looks like this will be April 2019. Theresa May intends to trigger article 50 in March and, from this point, there are two years allowed to complete the exit negotiations. This can be extended if all Member States agree.

At the same time the UK need to negotiate a new form of Trade Agreement with the EU. It is generally believed however that this will be difficult to achieve in two years.

 

  1. What happens if there is no Trade Agreement in place in April 2019?

This is not fully clear. There is a view that a transitional agreement will be put in place however this will depend on whether the trade negotiations are proceeding well.

If not, the UK will revert to being a 3rd Country for the purposes of trading with the EU - essentially it will be treated similarly to the US in terms of imports and exports.

 

  1. What does this mean?

If there is no Trade Agreement then all imports from the UK will be subject to EU import duties.

These duties range from 0% to 14% for industrial goods, 8% to 50% for Agri-food products and 12% for clothing.

 

  1. Will there be a border with the UK?

As a non-EU country the UK will have a border with the EU.

 

  1. How does this differ from the current situation?

This differs from the present situation whereby all 28 EU Member States (which includes the UK) have a common border with all countries outside the EU.  This is called a Customs Union and means that all members of the Union (the EU 28 + Turkey and Andorra):

  1. Operate a common external tariff on all imports so that no matter which country you import into the duty rate applied is identical
  2. Negotiate Free Trade Agreements as a bloc.

 

  1. Why would the UK leave the Customs Union?

Theresa May has stated she wants the UK to have the ability to set its own tariffs and to negotiate its own trade agreements. This is fundamentally incompatible with the rules of a Customs Union.

 

  1. Will the EU and UK negotiate a preferential trade agreement instead then?

It is assumed that some form of trade agreement would be in everyone's interest however this will depend on the negotiations which take place over the next two years.

The most recent comprehensive trade agreement was concluded between the EU and Canada and would provide a good model. However this agreement took eight years to agree.

 

  1. How will this affect the movement of goods?

Regardless of whether, or if, a Trade Agreement is concluded all companies moving goods between the EU and the UK (and vice-versa) will be required to lodge import and export declarations with the relevant authorities. All goods moving across or through the borders therefore will be subject to customs controls and intervention in the same manner as applies to any non-EU import or Export.  If we look at the EU Canada FTA all imports and exports will continue to require import and export declarations to be lodged with Customs regardless of the applicable duty rate.  In addition goods will only qualify for the reduced (or preferential) rate if you can prove your goods qualify as "originating products"

 

  1. How do you qualify goods as "originating"?

This is a complex process. All goods have an applicable tariff code and each tariff code has a listed rule of origin.  Therefore you first need to determine the tariff classification and secondly to check the applicable rule of origin for that heading.

A good rule of thumb is that goods are generally required to obtain 60% added value in the EU (to qualify as EU originating) or undergo a change of tariff heading between imported raw materials and finished products. Minimal processing operations or simple assembly operations do not qualify.

 

  1. What if I move my goods through the UK to get to Europe?

The recent IEA survey found that 2/3 of exporters transit their goods through the UK to mainland Europe and further afield. Goods currently move freely as part of this process and do not encounter any customs requirements.  Going forward this will now be equivalent to goods moving out of the EU to get back into the EU.

It is hoped there will be transit agreements put in place to simplify the movement, however goods will still be subject to customs controls, transit requirements, and guarantees.

 

  1. What should I be doing now to plan for this?

There are several steps to take at this point. Primarily we would advise the following:

  1. Review your supply chain to determine where goods may be caught by customs controls and documentary requirements
  2. Determine the options for alternative routes
  3. Assess your company’s ability to handle these additional requirements
  4. Identify the additional information which will be required by Customs e.g. Tariff Classifications, Customs Origin, EU status of goods.

The additional time and cost involved in moving goods through a non-EU border are extensive and, unfortunately, there is no current scenario whereby this will not be a requirement for the UK if they leave the Customs Union.

It is also advisable to:

  • Assess the impact of additional EU Import duty costs if introduced
  • Assess the impact of WTO rates on any UK imports

While this would be worst case scenario planning it is important to be prepared for these costs. Customs duties are "sticking taxes" and, once paid, are generally not recoverable. They will therefore be a direct hit to your bottom line.

 

For more information about our partnership with BDO Ireland click here.

BDO Ireland | | 0 comments