Welcome to the May 2012 edition of the IEA Customs and Trade Newsletter


1.      Dublin Port Customs Attendance Hours

2.      Critical date in REACH legislation, final registration deadline is May 31st 2013

3.      EU adopts new rules on collection of excise duties

4.    EU and China to agree mutual recognition between their respective Authorised Economic Programmes (AEO) by end 2012.

5.      Argentina import restrictions causing many complaints at WTO  

6.      New Singapore medical device market entry  Regulations

7.      Future of VAT: Added value with business in mind

8.      Financial Transaction Tax: Fair contribution by the financial sector

 

If you have any queries on the content, please give me a call, or send me an e-mail; jfwhelan@irishexporters.ie.

 

The next Customs and Trade Seminar with expert speakers to keep you right up to speed in ensuring your business is maximising on customs and trade application will be held in Dublin on the 31st May. Your invitation will be sent shortly – please mark it in your diary.

 

John Whelan
Chief Executive

Irish Exporters Association

 

 

 

 

1.      Dublin Port Customs attendance hours

As previously advised, you will be aware that Customs have recently curtailed their hours of attendance in the New Custom House, Dublin Port for exporters by closing on Sunday mornings and Bank Holiday mornings.

To re-affirm, the hours of attendance on Bank Holiday weekends are as follows:

Saturday 07.00 - 11.00 and 18.00 - 22.00; Sunday 18.00 - 22.00; Monday 18.00 - 22.00.

Hours of attendance on regular weekends are Saturday 07.00 - 11.00 and 18.00 - 22.00 and Sunday 18.00 - 22.00.

 

2.       Critical date in REACH legislation, final registration deadline is May 31st 2013

 By then, all substances m manufactured in, or imported into, the EU at between 100 and 1000 tonnes per annum must be registered. The Health and Safety Authority will soon launch an information campaign to ensure all Irish companies affected by the deadline are prepared for it. In the meantime, there are two upcoming deadlines that companies need to be aware of and we have detailed these below.

 

By May 31st 2012, the following deadlines in REACH apply:

·         Late pre-registration. Companies who manufacture or import phase-in substances for the first time at over 1 tonne per annum can still avail of late pre-registration. For substances between 100 and 1000 tonnes per annum, the late pre-registration period ends on May 31st 2012.  Any company with substances in this tonnage band still wishing to avail of the late pre-registration must submit their application to ECHA by this date.

·         Downstream Users of substances should contact their suppliers also by May 31st 2012 in order to ensure that their use is covered in the registration dossier. For a full list of substances to be registered in 2013 see the ECHA website (this is not an exhaustive or complete list only those notified by Lead Registrants to date)

 

As stated before, do not hesitate to contact the IEA or the Chemicals Helpdesk by calling 1890 289 389 or by emailing your query to chemicals@hsa.ie , if you have any queries .

Further information on REACH 2013 is available the ECHA website at the following link: http://echa.europa.eu/web/guest/reach-2013

 

 

3.      EU adopts new rules on collection of excise duties

Commissioner Algirdas Ĺ emeta welcomes the adoption today by the Council of a regulation for new rules on administrative cooperation in the field of excise duties. The adoption of this regulation will make it easier for Member States to control the movement of excise goods and speed up the collection of excise duties (see IP/11/1339).

 

4.      EU and China to agree mutual recognition between their respective Authorised Economic Programmes (AEO) by end 2012

 

The EU and China are involved in discussions at present with a view to concluding a mutual recognition agreement between the EU AEO Programme and the Chinese Classified Management of Enterprises Programme. It is expected that agreement will be reached by the end of the year.

Mutual recognition between AEO programmes involves a country’s government formally recognising the AEO programme of another country’s government and thereby granting benefits to the AEOs of that country.

 

Benefits for Irish AEO certified exporters

Once mutual recognition of AEO Programmes is agreed between the EU and China, Irish companies that are certified under the EU AEO Programme will get significant benefits when exporting to China.

 

Exports leaving the EU

 

EU Customs Administrations will provide trade facilitation measures to Irish AEO certified exporting companies, such as:

 

  • A lower customs risk score in customs risk analysis systems when profiling.
  • Priority treatment if physical checks have to be carried out on goods.
  • Reduced data sets need only be provided in respect of safety and security.
  • Stronger position to benefit from Customs simplified procedures.
  • Waivers in respect of Customs performance bonds which in some cases can mean significant financial savings.

Imports entering China

 

Chinese Customs will provide trade facilitation measures to Irish AEO certified exporting companies, such as:

 

  • Assignment of special Customs Officers to help companies to coordinate and resolve Customs issues at import.
  • Lower Customs examination rates at import.
  • Submission of Customs declarations at the place of registration.
  • Inspection and clearance procedures available at all ports.
  • Inspection and clearance formalities available at the business sites of companies.
  • Priority handling for urgent clearance formalities during out of working hours and during holidays.
  • Priority in the handling of trade formalities, such as entering records, modifying and reporting for verification purposes.
  • Priority in handling declaration registration formalities.

Companies that are not AEO certified

 

Companies that are not AEO certified will be unable to avail of these benefits.  While exports by companies which are not AEO certified may not be slowed passing through Chinese Customs, this cannot be guaranteed since it is understood that Chinese Customs will apply more intensive controls on the goods of non-AEO importers following mutual recognition.

 

 

5.      Argentina import restrictions causing many complaints at WTO  

At the World Trade Organisation ( WTO) Council meeting in March the United States on behalf of 12 other members (Australia, the European Union, Israel, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Switzerland, Chinese Taipei, Thailand and Turkey), read a joint statement expressing deepening concerns regarding what it said were trade-restrictive measures taken by Argentina. It said that since 2008, Argentina had greatly expanded the list of products subject to non-automatic import licensing requirements, including laptops, home appliances, air conditioners, tractors, machinery and tools, autos and auto parts, plastics, chemical, tyres, toys, footwear, textiles and apparel, luggage, bicycles and paper products. It said that in January 2012, Argentina announced regulations requiring pre-registration, review and approval of each and every import transaction. It said that these regulations were creating long delays and adding huge costs for many exporters. It urged Argentina to remove these trade restrictions, adding that these members reserve their rights to pursue this matter further. Mexico said that it was joining the statement because Argentina's measures were having a serious impact on Mexican exporters.

China said that it hoped that the measures are only temporary as a large number of its exporters have also been affected. Chile, Colombia, Peru, Singapore, Malaysia, and Hong Kong, China also expressed concerns.

Argentina rejected the joint statement as unjustified. It maintained that the measures were compatible with WTO rules, adding that it had undertaken new measures to facilitate the processing of imports. It said that it had responded to these concerns in previous meetings of the Goods Council and the Import Licensing Committee. It noted that its imports rose by 30% in 2011 — the highest increase among G-20 countries and evidence that it was not restricting imports. Argentina expressed concern about the threat to the use of legitimate policy tools by developing countries to promote development, especially during the current economic crisis. It said that developed countries were the ones restricting trade through the use of subsidies and tariff peaks.

 

6.      New Singapore medical device market entry regulations

The Health Sciences Authority (HSA), Singapore's medical device regulatory body, has announced plans to establish easier market entry effective May 1, 2012 for some lower-risk devices. The move should boost interest among foreign manufacturers in the Singapore market.

Non-sterile Class A devices will be exempted from all HSA registration requirements, while Class A sterile devices will undergo 30-day registrations. About 80% of Class A devices currently sold in Singapore will qualify for the new exemption, according to HSA estimates.

For Class B medical devices, HSA will implement an Immediate Registration Route as well as an Expedited Registration Route effective September 1, 2012.

The Immediate Registration Route allows immediate Singapore market access for Class B devices that have already been approved by at least two of the following agencies: the US FDA, Health Canada, the Australian TGA, a European Union Competent Authority, or Japan's MHLW. Qualifying devices must also have been marketed for at least three years with no safety issues arising.

The Expedited Registration Route entails a 60-day registration period for Class B devices that have either obtained market entry in any two of the major medical device markets (US, EU, Japan, Canada or Australia) OR obtained market entry in one of those markets and have been commercialized for at least three years with no safety issues. 

In addition, the HSA plans to set up a lower-tier fee structure for its Special Authorization Route (SAR) path to market designed for innovative, low-cost and low-volume medical devices. Beginning August 1, 2012, the HSA will temporarily waive SAR fees for all applicants that submit their devices for SAR registration before December 31, 2012. 

Source ; Emergo

 

7.       Future of VAT: Added value with business in mind

The European Commission adopted a communication setting out the main characteristics of a simpler, more efficient and more robust VAT system for the EU. For more information see the communication (COM/2011/851Description: pdf Description: Choose translations of the previous link) and the frequently asked questions (MEMO/11/874 Description: Choose translations of the previous link).

 

8.      Financial  Ttansaction Tax : Fair contribution by the financial sector

The European Commission puts forward a proposal for a financial transaction tax. For more information see the proposal (COM/2011/594Description: pdf Description: Choose translations of the previous link) the frequently asked questions (MEMO/11/640 Description: Choose translations of the previous link), the citizens' summaryDescription: pdf Description: Choose translations of the previous linkand our dedicated web page.

 


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